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Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
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Basic Information
Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
More InformationLatest News
Health Tip: Avoid Baby Sleep PositionersHelping Preemies Avoid Unnecessary AntibioticsProtecting Preemies From Stress Might Improve Later Mental Health'Sleep Positioners' a Danger to Baby: FDAClinical Exome Sequencing Useful for Critically Ill InfantsTdap Given in Pregnancy Protects Infants From PertussisWhooping Cough Shot Works, But Many Moms-to-Be Skip It: CDCHealth Tip: Breast-feeding May Help TeethHeart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term BabiesHealth Tip: Is Your Baby Teething?Pediatricians Increasingly Aligned With Breastfeeding GuidelinesHigher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant DeathsHealth Tip: Design a Non-Toxic NurseryParents Getting Better at Using Car Seats SafelyVision Problems Common in Babies Infected With Zika'Modest at Best' Discriminatory Ability for CBC Test in InfantsDoes General Anesthesia Affect Babies' Brains?Health Tip: Avoid Juice Before Age 1Race/Ethnicity Shown to Factor Into Quality of Care in NICUHep B Vaccine Should Be Given Sooner: Pediatricians GroupSome Newborns Don't Get Heart Defect, Hearing Loss TestsAnti-Vaccine Info in Pregnancy May Delay Infant ImmunizationToo Many Babies Still Placed on Stomach to Sleep: StudyAnti-Vaccine Family Members, Friends Spur Many Moms to Delay Baby's ShotsIncrease in Survival Without Severe Disability for PreemiesParents of Preemies End Up Just Fine: StudyCharacteristics of Diabetes in Infancy ExploredLow Blood Sugar in Newborns Tied to Brain Problems LaterHealth Tip: Don't Use Sunscreen on NewbornsPicky Eater? It Might Just Be Your Child's PersonalityIs Infant Drug Withdrawal Likelier When Opioids Used With Psychiatric Drugs?Alarms Could Save Children From Being Left in Hot CarsMaking the Most of Childhood Wellness VisitsMRI Approved for Young Infants in Intensive CareCan Fetal Alcohol Damage Be Undone?Impaired Eyesight May Be First Sign of Zika Damage in BabiesHealth Tip: Getting Toddlers to Try New FoodsWidening 'Race Gap' in U.S. Infant DeathsHealth Tip: Are My Toddler's Eating Habits Normal?Probiotic Supplements Failed to Prevent Babies' InfectionsHealth Tip: When Children Grind Their TeethA Baby's Skin No Match for the SunTissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth: CDCCould You Raise a 'No-Diaper' Baby?Health Tip: Considering Bed Sharing?Medical Costs Soar for U.S. Babies Born Addicted to OpioidsMany Preemies Don't Struggle in SchoolBabies' Fascination With Faces May Start in the WombEarly Egg Intro May Improve Growth in Young ChildrenSpecial Brain Scans May Predict Autism in High-Risk Babies
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Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
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Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)

Health Tip: Storing Breast Milk Safely

HealthDay News
by -- Diana Kohnle
Updated: May 22nd 2017

(HealthDay News) -- If you've pumped breast milk, you'll want to store it properly so it's safe to drink at the next feeding.

The Mayo Clinic offers these guidelines:

  • Always wash hands carefully with soap and water. Choose a clean container that's made of glass or BPA-free plastic, or storage bags made for breast milk.
  • Write the date that you expressed the milk on the container, and your baby's name if storing outside your home. Use waterproof label and marker.
  • Store milk in the back of the refrigerator, where the temperature is coldest. It will stay safe for up to 5 days before you should use or freeze it.
  • You can also store breast milk in the freezer. Use it within 6 months.
  • Store enough milk in a single container for one feeding. If freezing, allow extra room for milk to expand.