Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Drug Addiction
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Is Infant Drug Withdrawal Likelier When Opioids Used With Psychiatric Drugs?Doctors Still Overprescribing Opioids in U.S.ACOG: Opioid Agonist Rx First Choice in Affected PregnanciesAt-Risk Pain Patients Can Cut Opioid Use With Psychology ToolsRx Changes, Counseling, Regular Visits Can Cut Opioid DeathsSharp Rise Among Women for Opioid-Related HospitalizationsOpioid-Linked Hospitalizations Rising Fastest for Women: StudyMedical Costs Soar for U.S. Babies Born Addicted to OpioidsHeart Infections Spike as Injection-Drug Abuse Climbs: CDCMarijuana May Make Your Gums Go to PotMeth Addicts' Hearts May Improve If They QuitNew FDA Head Outlines 'Forceful Steps' Against Opioid CrisisChecking Patient's Drug History May Help Curb Opioid AbuseERs May Need to Rethink Opioid Prescription PracticesNew Hepatitis C Infections Hit 15-Year High: CDCBabies Born Addicted to Opioids Often Struggle With LearningAMA Urges Doctors to Talk About Safe Opioid Storage, DisposalInitial Rx Can Affect Likelihood of Long-Term Opioid UseOpioid Dependence Can Start in Just a Few DaysWhen Cocaine's in the Mix, Safe Sex May Not BeKids Born to Opioid-Addicted Moms Seem to Fare Poorly in SchoolU.S. Report Cites the Good and Bad on MarijuanaVomiting Disorder on Rise in Weed-Friendly ColoradoPot May Restrict Blood Flow to Brain: StudyPot Use in Pregnancy on the Upswing, Study FindsWhat You Need to Know When Prescribed an Opioid PainkillerRural Hospitals See Surge in Opioid-Dependent BabiesBaby Boomers Going to PotMen More Likely to Use Marijuana Than Women, Study FindsMany Take Opioids Reluctantly for Back Pain: SurveyRisk of Opioid Addiction Up 37 Percent Among Young U.S. AdultsStudy Links Pot Use to Relapse in Psychosis Patients
Links

ACOG: Opioid Agonist Rx First Choice in Affected Pregnancies


HealthDay News
Updated: Jul 28th 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, July 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- While opioid agonist pharmacotherapy continues to be the recommended therapy for pregnant women with an opioid use disorder, medically supervised withdrawal can be considered under the care of a physician experienced in perinatal addiction treatment and with informed consent, according to a committee opinion published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Maria A. Mascola, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology Committee on Obstetric Practice and the American Society of Addiction Medicine present ways to address opioid use in pregnancy, which has escalated dramatically in recent years.

The authors note that pregnancy offers an opportunity to identify and treat women with substance use disorders. Substance use screening should be universal, form part of comprehensive obstetric care, and be performed at the first prenatal visit. Opioid agonist pharmacotherapy is recommended for pregnant women with opioid use disorder, and is preferable to medically supervised withdrawal. The authors note there may be a select group of women who make an informed choice of medically supervised withdrawal, which should be under the care of an experienced physician and include long-term follow-up and support to help prevent relapse. Pediatric care providers should monitor infants born to women who used opioids during pregnancy for neonatal abstinence withdrawal syndrome.

"Medication-assisted treatment improves adherence to prenatal care and addiction treatment programs and has been shown to reduce the risk of pregnancy complications," Mascola said in a statement.

Abstract/Full Text