Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
Billing questions? Call: 413.540.1212
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Resources
Basic Information
Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
More InformationLatest News
Zika Babies Facing Increasing Health Problems With AgeNearby Fracking Linked to Low Birth WeightsWindow Blinds: A Silent Killer in Your HomeHealth Tip: Starting a Tooth Brushing Routine EarlyWhen a Preemie Goes Home, Dad Stresses OutState Newborn Screening Policies Cut Infant Cardiac DeathsLock Eyes With Your Baby, Synchronize Brain Waves?Newborns in Pain Might Not Show ItHealth Tip: Childproof Your HomePractice Variation in Treatment for Bronchiolitis in InfantsHealth Tip: How to Clean a Breast PumpBabies Start Connecting Words Early OnHealth Tip: Infant Medication Advice For New MomsHow to Spot the Virus That Puts Some Babies in the HospitalProlonged Breast-Feeding May Guard Against Teen EczemaVaccination Coverage High for Children Aged 19 to 35 MonthsU.S. Preemie Birth Rates Rise 2 Years in a RowDelayed Cord Clamping Not Beneficial for Preterm InfantsEven Partial Breast-Feeding for First Few Months Lowers SIDS RiskHealth Tip: Sleep Train Your BabyACAAI: Doctors Not Adhering to New Peanut GuidelinesHypothermia May Help Newborns With EncephalopathyOb/Gyns Warn Against 'Vaginal Seeding' Trend for NewbornsKids, Don't Touch the Toys at the Doctor's OfficeCDC Updates Zika Guidance for Infant CareHigher Doses of Vitamin D May Boost Preemies' Bone HealthHealth Tip: Avoid Baby Sleep PositionersHelping Preemies Avoid Unnecessary AntibioticsProtecting Preemies From Stress Might Improve Later Mental Health'Sleep Positioners' a Danger to Baby: FDAClinical Exome Sequencing Useful for Critically Ill InfantsTdap Given in Pregnancy Protects Infants From PertussisWhooping Cough Shot Works, But Many Moms-to-Be Skip It: CDCHealth Tip: Breast-feeding May Help TeethHeart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term BabiesHealth Tip: Is Your Baby Teething?Pediatricians Increasingly Aligned With Breastfeeding GuidelinesHigher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant DeathsHealth Tip: Design a Non-Toxic NurseryParents Getting Better at Using Car Seats SafelyVision Problems Common in Babies Infected With Zika'Modest at Best' Discriminatory Ability for CBC Test in InfantsDoes General Anesthesia Affect Babies' Brains?Health Tip: Avoid Juice Before Age 1Race/Ethnicity Shown to Factor Into Quality of Care in NICUHep B Vaccine Should Be Given Sooner: Pediatricians GroupSome Newborns Don't Get Heart Defect, Hearing Loss TestsAnti-Vaccine Info in Pregnancy May Delay Infant ImmunizationToo Many Babies Still Placed on Stomach to Sleep: StudyAnti-Vaccine Family Members, Friends Spur Many Moms to Delay Baby's Shots
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)

Air Mattresses Present a Growing Safety Risk to Infants


HealthDay News
Updated: Jun 5th 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An air mattress can present a hazardous environment for infants, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Air mattresses are becoming increasing popular among low-income, transient people due to their inexpensive cost and portability. But these beds carry significant risks for infants, including the possibility of death, according to study authors Jennifer Doering, Ph.D., R.N., from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Trina Salm Ward, Ph.D., M.S.W., from the University of Georgia in Athens. "Even when fully inflated, air mattresses can mold to the infant's face and obstruct the airway by forming an occlusive seal," they write. "The risk increases when air mattresses leak during use. Underinflation was a factor in some of the infant deaths reviewed."

Doering and Ward note that according to the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System, there were 108 infant deaths involving air mattresses reported in 24 states between 2004 and 2015. But the researchers said such deaths are probably underreported. There's no specific box to check to mark a death as related to an air mattress, the study authors explained.

The authors checked policy statements from 12 organizations -- including federal agencies and health, consumer, and parent groups -- and found that only one mentioned the hazard posed to infants by air mattresses. Doering and Ward call for improved data collection on air mattress-related infant deaths and for more public health organizations to warn about the threat.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)