Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
Billing questions? Call: 413.540.1212
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Resources
Basic Information
Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
More InformationLatest News
Zika Babies Facing Increasing Health Problems With AgeNearby Fracking Linked to Low Birth WeightsWindow Blinds: A Silent Killer in Your HomeHealth Tip: Starting a Tooth Brushing Routine EarlyWhen a Preemie Goes Home, Dad Stresses OutState Newborn Screening Policies Cut Infant Cardiac DeathsLock Eyes With Your Baby, Synchronize Brain Waves?Newborns in Pain Might Not Show ItHealth Tip: Childproof Your HomePractice Variation in Treatment for Bronchiolitis in InfantsHealth Tip: How to Clean a Breast PumpBabies Start Connecting Words Early OnHealth Tip: Infant Medication Advice For New MomsHow to Spot the Virus That Puts Some Babies in the HospitalProlonged Breast-Feeding May Guard Against Teen EczemaVaccination Coverage High for Children Aged 19 to 35 MonthsU.S. Preemie Birth Rates Rise 2 Years in a RowDelayed Cord Clamping Not Beneficial for Preterm InfantsEven Partial Breast-Feeding for First Few Months Lowers SIDS RiskHealth Tip: Sleep Train Your BabyACAAI: Doctors Not Adhering to New Peanut GuidelinesHypothermia May Help Newborns With EncephalopathyOb/Gyns Warn Against 'Vaginal Seeding' Trend for NewbornsKids, Don't Touch the Toys at the Doctor's OfficeCDC Updates Zika Guidance for Infant CareHigher Doses of Vitamin D May Boost Preemies' Bone HealthHealth Tip: Avoid Baby Sleep PositionersHelping Preemies Avoid Unnecessary AntibioticsProtecting Preemies From Stress Might Improve Later Mental Health'Sleep Positioners' a Danger to Baby: FDAClinical Exome Sequencing Useful for Critically Ill InfantsTdap Given in Pregnancy Protects Infants From PertussisWhooping Cough Shot Works, But Many Moms-to-Be Skip It: CDCHealth Tip: Breast-feeding May Help TeethHeart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term BabiesHealth Tip: Is Your Baby Teething?Pediatricians Increasingly Aligned With Breastfeeding GuidelinesHigher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant DeathsHealth Tip: Design a Non-Toxic NurseryParents Getting Better at Using Car Seats SafelyVision Problems Common in Babies Infected With Zika'Modest at Best' Discriminatory Ability for CBC Test in InfantsDoes General Anesthesia Affect Babies' Brains?Health Tip: Avoid Juice Before Age 1Race/Ethnicity Shown to Factor Into Quality of Care in NICUHep B Vaccine Should Be Given Sooner: Pediatricians GroupSome Newborns Don't Get Heart Defect, Hearing Loss TestsAnti-Vaccine Info in Pregnancy May Delay Infant ImmunizationToo Many Babies Still Placed on Stomach to Sleep: StudyAnti-Vaccine Family Members, Friends Spur Many Moms to Delay Baby's Shots
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)

Making the Most of Childhood Wellness Visits

HealthDay News
by By Julie Davis
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jul 21st 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born today will have about a dozen wellness visits by the time they reach age 3. At that point, these checkups typically drop to just once a year, often before kids head back to school.

So it's important to make the most of each visit, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

These visits include a physical exam as well as developmental, behavioral and learning assessments. They're also your opportunity to ask questions.

With limited time in the exam room, make your list of questions in advance and prioritize them in order of importance. Also, ask any caregivers who spend lots of time with your child if they have questions or concerns that you should bring up.

Talk about school safety with the pediatrician, including on the playground and in the cafeteria, especially if your child has allergies. And ask about any precautions to take if your youngster plays sports -- or wants to.

Go over your child's immunization record and ask about important health vaccines like meningitis and HPV. Discuss how to avoid the growing problem of childhood obesity and how your child can get more exercise. As your child enters the teen years, expect your doctor to bring up health issues like drinking, smoking, drugs, sexual activity and even depression.

Experts warn that you shouldn't leave the office confused about anything that was discussed. If any recommendations are unclear, ask for clarification until you understand what the doctor is saying and why. Finally, check in with the physician's assistant and/or the office nurse -- they might be your first point of contact in an emergency.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has wellness visit checklists from baby's first visit up to age 21 that you can print, fill in and bring with you.