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Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
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Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
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Breast Milk May Boost Preemies' Brain DevelopmentNumber of Infants Born With Syphilis Reaches 20-Year High: CDCMilk Straight From Breast Best for Baby's WeightParents Fret Over Fussy Eaters - but What Works?Heart Defects, Sleep Apnea a Deadly Mix for InfantsHealth Tip: Prevent Diaper RashInfant Walkers Still Injuring Thousands of BabiesTalking to Baby Might Boost Middle School SuccessHealth Tip: Promote Play for Your ChildPediatricians Make Change to Child Car Seat GuidelinesNewborns' Immune Systems Ramp Up After BirthIs a Health Secret Hiding in Your Infant's Diapers?Health Tip: Your Toddler Can Be a VegetarianAre High-Tech Baby Monitors Worth It? Or Even Safe?Good News, Bad News in U.S. Breastfeeding ReportHealth Woes Hit 1 in 7 Babies Exposed to Zika in U.S. TerritoriesTo Combat Childhood Obesity, Start at Birth … or Even BeforeBreast-Feeding Suffers in Homes With Smokers: StudyHomeless Babies Face Lasting Health RisksHealth Tip: When Small Children Play Near WaterWhy Choo-Choo is Better for Baby's Language Skills Than TrainDrinking While Breast-Feeding May Dampen Child's Brain DevelopmentAre You Car Seat Savvy?Food Allergies Less Severe in Infants: StudyMany Young Kids Not Screened for Developmental DelaysHealth Tip: Recognizing Hearing Loss in InfantsWant Good Sleep for Baby? Food May Be KeyA-C-T to Prevent Hot Car TragediesLook Before Locking: Protect Your Child From a Hot Car TragedySmart Steps for a Safe NurseryMom's Voice: The Sleep Secret for Babies in Intensive CareHealth Tip: Soothing Baby During TeethingClean Skin, Hands Critical for 'Kangaroo Care' for PreemiesAmericans' Obsession With Sugar Starts in InfancyNo Safety Concerns With DTaP Combo Vaccine for Kids: StudyFish Oil May Protect the Youngest HeartsCould Early Birth Hinder Adult Success?Health Tip: When Baby Spits UpTreatment for Teething Pain Poses Serious Health Threat: FDAFetal Growth, Maternal Anger Impact Infant RegulationInfants Know Real 'Baby Talk' When They Hear ItOpioid Crisis Means More Newborns With Hepatitis C, But Few Get TestedCCHD Newborn Screening May Detect Other DiseasesHealth Tip: Prevent Hand, Foot and Mouth DiseaseMultiple Anesthesia Exposures Affect Learning and AttentionHealth Tip: Milestones to Look for by Age 5Anesthesia Doesn't Seem to Harm Child's IQ: StudyHealth Tip: Prevent Poisoning at HomeHeath Tip; How to Introduce Your Child to PeanutsHealth Tip: When to See a Doctor for Cradle Cap
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Nutrients in Child's First 1,000 Days Key for Neurodevelopment


HealthDay News
Updated: Jan 22nd 2018

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MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The provision of adequate nutrients and healthy eating during a child's first 1,000 days is important for optimal neurodevelopment, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement published online Jan. 22 in Pediatrics.

Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg, M.D., and Michael K. Georgieff, M.D., from the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital in Minneapolis, address maternal prenatal nutrition and children's nutrition in the first two years of life (1,000 days) and its long-term impact.

The researchers note that nutritional status during this period may program child and adult health risks, including obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. Calories are essential for fetal and child growth, but are not adequate for normal brain development. Protein, zinc, iron, choline, folate, iodine, vitamins A, D, B6, and B12, and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are key nutrients that support neurodevelopment. During the critical period of brain development, failure to provide key nutrients may result in lifelong deficits in brain function, despite subsequent repletion of nutrients. Pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants, and toddlers should be referred to existing services for nutrition support. All providers caring for children should advocate for healthy diets in the first 1,000 days.

"Prioritizing public policies that ensure the provision of adequate nutrients and healthy eating during this crucial time would ensure that all children have an early foundation for optimal neurodevelopment, a key factor in long-term health," the authors write.

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