Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
Billing questions? Call: 413.540.1212
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Closed Cars Can Become Deathly Hot in MinutesPreventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary CareIncrease in Pediatric ADHD Meds Exposures from 2000 to 2011Race May Play Role in Kids' Suicide RiskOverdoses on ADHD Drugs May Be RisingMany Parents Say Restaurant Fare Has Made Kids Sick: PollHealth Tip: Plan Your Child's ChoresHealth Tip: Understanding Childhood ArthritisBig Rise Seen in U.S. Kids, Teens Attempting SuicidePrescription Med Use in Children Down Overall From 1999 to 2014Fewer Antibiotics for Kids, But More ADHD DrugsDirty Air in Pregnancy May Raise Kid's Blood Pressure RiskMore U.S. Parents Smoking Pot Around KidsShield Your Kids From the Sun's Damaging RaysHealth Tip: If Your Child Becomes Too AggressiveAge of First Football Tackles Tied to Neuro Symptom OnsetHealth Tip: Keep Your Kids Safer on the InternetHealth Tip: Keep Communicating With Your ChildKids' Exposure to Domestic Violence Takes Economic TollIf Kids Exposed to Pot, Tobacco Smoke, ER Visits RiseInjured Kids Can Have Lasting Mental Scars, TooStrict Gun Laws Spare Young Lives: StudyLow Neighborhood Walkability Increases Risk of Asthma in KidsSleep-Deprived Kids at Risk of ObesityMost U.S. Adults Support More Mental Health Services for KidsMaternal, Child Sugar Intake Could Impact Child CognitionHealth Tip: Protect Your Eyes During SportsGardening Isn't Just for AdultsSoda During Pregnancy May Not Help Baby's BrainDisagreement Seen Over Barriers to Kids' Daily Use of Asthma MedsDon't Panic Over 'Dry Drowning' Reports, ER Docs SayFor Soccer Players, Heading May Pose Bigger Risk Than CollisionsCould Caffeine During Pregnancy Spur Weight Gain in Kids?AHA: New Rules on Saving Kids Stricken With Cardiac ArrestContextual Factors Linked to Overeating, Loss of ControlTransgender Kids Face High Risk of Mental Health WoesPreschool, Day Care Not Asthma Triggers: StudyAHA: Rx for Sedentary Kids -- Friends and the Great OutdoorsFewer U.S. Kids Are Getting CavitiesWhat Your Kids Want to Tell You About Social MediaGlycemic Extremes in T1DM Impact Cognitive Skills in KidsKids in Tough Neighborhoods Head to ER More OftenLosing Excess Weight in Childhood Cuts Diabetes RiskBlood Levels of Toxic Fire Retardants Declining in KidsObesity Can Lead to Liver Damage by Age 8: StudyProtect Your Child From Opioid PoisoningChildren's Hoverboard, Skateboard Injuries Are SimilarSports 'Sponsorships' Hawk Junk Food to KidsHoverboard Injuries Speeding U.S. Kids to the ERAHA: 'Beating' Stroke, New Hip-Hop Program Helps Kids Save a Life
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)
Childhood Special Education

Easing Your Child's Asthma

HealthDay News
by By Julie Davis
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Feb 6th 2018

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If your child is among the 10 percent of kids with asthma, you want to do everything you can to control it.

Start by working with your child's allergist to identify his or her unique asthma triggers and ways to avoid them.

Common asthma triggers include:

  • Secondhand smoke from cigarettes, wood-burning stoves and campfires,
  • Pet dander from furry or feathered animals,
  • Cockroaches or cockroach allergen,
  • Dust mites in home furnishings and stuffed toys,
  • Pollen and outdoor pollution,
  • Odors/fragrances from household products to perfumes,
  • Weather extremes,
  • Stress and other emotions,
  • Exercise,
  • Some foods.

Secondhand smoke is especially dangerous. Keep a smoke-free home and car, and avoid other smokers. If you smoke, quit.

Almost any pet can pose a problem. Talk to your child's allergist before buying a pet. If you already have one, ask how to limit triggers, like keeping it out of his or her bedroom.

Thorough cleaning can help with triggers ranging from mold to cockroaches to dust mites living in bedding, stuffed animals and carpeting. Be alert to outdoor air pollution and indoor odors from paint, cleaning products and fragrances. Exercise, everyday stress and even changes in the weather can bring on symptoms.

Have a written asthma action plan from the allergist that outlines all the steps to take in case of an asthma attack. A copy should be with the nurse at your child's school or daycare center.

A child's asthma action plan should include:

  • A list of triggers to avoid,
  • Easily understood prescription drug instructions,
  • Emergency contact information for you and all your child's health care providers,
  • Steps to take as soon as symptoms start,
  • Steps to take in a breathing emergency.

Understanding asthma will help ease even a young child's fears.

More information

Check out the parent and children pages from the American Lung Association for more ideas, including how to identify common asthma triggers and avoid them.