Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
Billing questions? Call: 413.540.1212
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Does Big Pharma Hike Prices When Meds Are in Short Supply?FDA Gets Tough on Juul, Other E-Cigarette Makers'No Documented Reason' for 1 in 3 Outpatient Opioid Rxs: StudyUrgent Care Centers Ease ER Burden in U.S.Poor Health Care Linked to 5 Million Deaths Worldwide a Year'Million Hearts' Project Aims to Prevent 1 Million Cardiac CrisesDoctor Burnout Likely to Impair CareHomelessness Takes Toll on Kids' Health Even Before They're BornFDA Warns of Dangers of Liquid Nitrogen in Food, DrinksStates Struggle With Onslaught of Opioid OD DeathsAHA: Why More Americans Are Kicking the Smoking HabitMonitoring System for Underage Tobacco Sales Falls Short: StudyHundreds of Human, Pet Homeopathy Products RecalledAHA: CPR Training at School Now Required in 38 StatesGovernment Rules Aimed at Curbing Opioid Prescriptions May Have BackfiredGut Enzyme Could Help Solve U.S. Blood ShortagesHealth Tip: Making an Emergency CallFrom Pigs to Peacocks, What's Up With Those 'Emotional-Support Animals'?Global Aid Programs Shortchange Teen Health Needs: StudyDoctors Write Fewer Opioid Scripts After Learning of Overdose DeathHow to Become an Educated PatientU.S. Murder, Suicide Rates Climbing AgainTo Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the MailMajority in U.S. Support Medical Pot, Think It Could Fight Opioid CrisisWhey Powder Blamed for Salmonella Tied to Ritz Crackers, Goldfish: FDAToo Few Americans Getting Screened for Cancer: CDCYou Have 11 Seconds to Tell Your Doc What's WrongFDA Warns of Deaths Tied to Tainted Synthetic PotWhere Are Opioid Painkillers Prescribed the Most?In the ICU, Patients' Relatives Often Mum About Care ConcernsResetting E-Prescriptions for Opioids Helps Curb Use: StudyHealth Tip: If You're 45 or Older, Get Screened for Colorectal CancerRed Cross Issues Nationwide Call for Blood DonationsDoctor Burnout Widespread, Helps Drive Many Medical ErrorsWarming Climate, More AC -- and More Unhealthy Smog AheadEven at 'Safe' Levels, Air Pollution May Boost Diabetes RiskDeath Certificate Data May Miss Many Opioid ODs: StudyRaise the Bar on CPR, Heart Group SaysWhen DEA Cracked Down on Opioids, Abusers Moved to Black Market: StudyStigma of Safe Needle Exchanges Lingers Despite Opioid EpidemicAHA: Drones a Lifesaver for Cardiac Arrest Patients?Millions Die Worldwide Each Year for Lack of Quality CareTips for Handling a Medical EmergencyAHA: Lifesaving Info Not Always a 911 Call AwayMany, But Not All, Hospitals Require Flu Shots for StaffersCancer Care Twice as Costly in U.S. Versus CanadaAHA: Health Concerns Haunt Puerto Rico as New Hurricane Season BeginsPot, Opioids Now Rival Alcohol as Factor in Driver DeathsThe ER or Urgent Care?Trumps Signs Bill Allowing Terminal Patients to Try Unproven Medicines
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Unchecked Air Pollution a Death Sentence for Millions: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 23rd 2018

new article illustration

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Quicker action to cut fossil fuel emissions and slow climate change could prevent as many as 153 million premature deaths worldwide this century, new research contends.

That's how many lives could be saved in 154 of the world's largest cities through immediate action to reduce emissions and limit the global temperature increase to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, instead of delaying the largest reductions, as some countries propose, the researchers said.

Taking action sooner rather than later would reduce premature death on all continents, with the biggest impact in Africa and Asia, computer simulations show, according to the researchers.

The new study shows the high cost to human life if nations take the lowest-cost approach to reducing emissions, according to study author Drew Shindell.

Shindell is a professor of earth sciences at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, in Durham, N.C.

In the lowest-cost approach, fossil fuel emissions would stay higher in the short-term in the hope they could be offset by future reductions.

"The lowest-cost approach only looks at how much it will cost to transform the energy sector. It ignores the human cost of more than 150 million lost lives, or the fact that slashing emissions in the near term will reduce long-term climate risk and avoid the need to rely on future carbon dioxide removal," Shindell said in a university news release.

"That's a very risky strategy, like buying something on credit and assuming you'll someday have a big enough income to pay it all back," he said.

Scientists have lots of historical data on air pollution and can project with "relatively high certainty" how many people would die in a given city under each scenario, Shindell said.

Los Angeles and New York are among six cities that could avoid as many as 320,000 premature deaths if international governments reduce carbon and other emissions now, he said.

"Hopefully, this information will help policymakers and the public grasp the benefits of accelerating carbon reductions in the near term, in a way that really hits home," Shindell said.

The report was published in the March 19 issue of the journal Nature Climate Change. Funding for the study came from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

More information

NASA has more on climate change.