Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
Billing questions? Call: 413.540.1212
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Resources
Basic Information
Development During Early Childhood, Toddler, and Preschool Stages Parenting Your Todder, Preschooler, and Young ChildToilet TrainingDisciplining Your Toddler, Preschooler, and Young ChildNurturing Your Toddler, Preschooler, and Young Child
Latest News
What Kids -- and Parents -- Fear Most at the Doctor's OfficeSkip the Cold Meds for Kids Under 6, Experts SayPath to Obesity May Start in PreschoolHealth Tip: Help Your Child Deal With Night TerrorsParents Fret Over Fussy Eaters - but What Works?Talking to Baby Might Boost Middle School SuccessHealth Tip: Promote Play for Your ChildEarly Eye Checks for Kids a Smart MovePediatricians Make Change to Child Car Seat GuidelinesHealth Tip: Pool Fencing Helps Prevent DrowningHealth Tip: Manage the Terrible 3'sHealth Tip: Your Toddler Can Be a VegetarianKids' Play Is Healthy, Pediatricians' Group SaysGive Your Child a Head Start With MathPicture This -- It Makes Kids Eat More VeggiesPreschoolers' Parents May Be Unprepared to Treat AsthmaHealth Tip: When Small Children Play Near WaterHealth Tip: Ear Tubes May Help Prevent Ear InfectionsDim the Lights to Help Your Child Fall AsleepAre You Car Seat Savvy?Many Young Kids Not Screened for Developmental DelaysA-C-T to Prevent Hot Car TragediesLook Before Locking: Protect Your Child From a Hot Car Tragedy25 U.S. Kids Treated in ERs Every Hour for Bike InjuriesSmartphone-Obsessed Parents May Mean Cranky KidsPediatricians Say No to SpankingNo Safety Concerns With DTaP Combo Vaccine for Kids: StudyCan Excess Weight in Toddlers Cause Brain Drain?Health Tip: How to Help Your Child Develop Healthy RelationshipsMany Parents Miss Speech Disorders in Young KidsCuriosity a Plus in the Classroom, Particularly for Poorer KidsSimple Drug Packaging Change Could Save Toddlers' LivesHealth Tip: Prevent Hand, Foot and Mouth DiseaseMultiple Anesthesia Exposures Affect Learning and AttentionHealth Tip: Milestones to Look for by Age 5Anesthesia Doesn't Seem to Harm Child's IQ: StudyE-Cig Liquid Remains a Poisoning Danger to Young KidsHealth Tip: Prevent Poisoning at HomeHeath Tip; How to Introduce Your Child to PeanutsVideo Games May Be OK for Toddlers -- If Mom or Dad Join InEven Toddlers Endangered by Opioids, Other Addictive DrugsReading to Your Kids Might Boost Their Social SkillsRear-Facing Car Seats Protect Tots in Crashes From Behind: StudyHealth Tip: Which Car Seat Should Your Child Use?Health Tip: Teach Your Kids Healthy Hair HabitsReading With Your Toddler Boosts More Than Just Language SkillsHealth Tip: Use a High Chair SafelyTonsillectomy May Carry More Risks in Kids Age 3 and UnderPoison Prevention at HomeVaccines Don't Weaken Babies' Immune Systems: Study
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)

Health Tip: Prevent Poisoning at Home


HealthDay News
Updated: Apr 13th 2018

(HealthDay News) -- Some 3 million people -- many under age 5 -- swallow or consume a poisonous substance each year, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.

Common sources include medicines, cleaning products, antifreeze, windshield wiper fluid, pesticides, furniture polish, gasoline, kerosene and lamp oil.

The academy advises on how to reduce the risks of poisoning at your home:

  • Store poisonous products in their original packaging in locked cabinets, out of sight and reach of children.
  • Keep all medicines in containers with safety caps and keep out of reach of children. Discard unused medication.
  • Never refer to medicine as "candy."
  • Check the label each time you give a child medicine to ensure proper dosage. For liquid medicine, use the dosing device that came with the product.
  • If you use e-cigarettes, keep liquid nicotine refills locked up out of children's reach. Buy only refills with child-resistant packaging.
  • Never keep poisonous products in food or drink containers.
  • Keep these products away from children: remote controls, key fobs, greeting cards and musical children's books. These devices may contain small button-cell batteries that are dangerous if swallowed.
  • Remove plants in your home or yard that are poisonous.