Call 413.540.1234 to
schedule an appointment
CONCERN/EAP: 413.534.2625
Billing questions? Call: 413.540.1212
CRISIS: 413.733.6661

Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Resources
Basic Information
Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
More InformationLatest News
Opioids Exact Another Toll on Newborns: Smaller HeadsScans, Ultrasound Spot Zika Brain DefectsCost of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: $23,000 Annually Per CaseOld-Fashioned Play Beats Digital Toys for Kids, Pediatricians SayWhat's Best for Babies With Recurring Ear InfectionsEarly Language Skills Tied to Higher IQ Decades LaterCleaning Your Baby's Pacifier By Sucking On It May Do Baby GoodMany Infants With Milk Allergy Seem to Outgrow ItTracking Preemies' Head Size May Yield IQ CluesBreast Milk, Formula Affect Baby's 'Microbiome' in Different WaysYour 6-Month-Old Isn't Sleeping Through the Night? RelaxHealth Tip: Prevent Temper TantrumsBringing Baby in a Lyft, Uber? Child Car Seats Are Rarely IncludedA Baby's Laugh Is Truly Monkey BusinessHealth Tip: Ease Separation AnxietyNavigating New Parent NervesSoft Furniture No Cushion Against Falls for Young KidsAntibiotics During Infancy May Up Childhood Obesity RiskFamily Leave Boosts Breastfeeding Rates, But Mostly for Affluent MomsBreastfeeding May Shield Baby From Antibiotic-Resistant BacteriaExperts Sound Warning About 'Baby Boxes'Breast Milk May Boost Preemies' Brain DevelopmentNumber of Infants Born With Syphilis Reaches 20-Year High: CDCMilk Straight From Breast Best for Baby's WeightParents Fret Over Fussy Eaters - but What Works?Heart Defects, Sleep Apnea a Deadly Mix for InfantsHealth Tip: Prevent Diaper RashInfant Walkers Still Injuring Thousands of BabiesTalking to Baby Might Boost Middle School SuccessHealth Tip: Promote Play for Your ChildPediatricians Make Change to Child Car Seat GuidelinesNewborns' Immune Systems Ramp Up After BirthIs a Health Secret Hiding in Your Infant's Diapers?Health Tip: Your Toddler Can Be a VegetarianAre High-Tech Baby Monitors Worth It? Or Even Safe?Good News, Bad News in U.S. Breastfeeding ReportHealth Woes Hit 1 in 7 Babies Exposed to Zika in U.S. TerritoriesTo Combat Childhood Obesity, Start at Birth … or Even BeforeBreast-Feeding Suffers in Homes With Smokers: StudyHomeless Babies Face Lasting Health RisksHealth Tip: When Small Children Play Near WaterWhy Choo-Choo is Better for Baby's Language Skills Than TrainDrinking While Breast-Feeding May Dampen Child's Brain DevelopmentAre You Car Seat Savvy?Food Allergies Less Severe in Infants: StudyMany Young Kids Not Screened for Developmental DelaysHealth Tip: Recognizing Hearing Loss in InfantsWant Good Sleep for Baby? Food May Be KeyA-C-T to Prevent Hot Car TragediesLook Before Locking: Protect Your Child From a Hot Car Tragedy
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)

Scans, Ultrasound Spot Zika Brain Defects

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Dec 5th 2018

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasounds and MRIs during pregnancy and after birth can detect most Zika-related brain abnormalities in infants, researchers report.

If a woman is infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy, her child can be born with microcephaly and other severe brain defects, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

The new study included 80 women in Columbia and two women in the United States who were exposed to Zika during pregnancy. The two U.S. women were exposed when they traveled to areas with active Zika transmission.

All of the women received fetal MRIs and ultrasound during the second and/or third trimester of pregnancy. After their infants were born, the children received brain MRIs and cranial ultrasounds.

Fetal MRI was able to detect Zika-related brain damage as early as 18 weeks' gestation and picked up significant fetal brain abnormalities not fully apparent in ultrasound imaging.

"A combination of prenatal MRI and [ultrasound] was able to detect Zika-related brain abnormalities during pregnancy, giving families timely information to prepare for the potential complex care needs of these infants," said study lead author Dr. Sarah Mulkey. She's a fetal-neonatal neurologist at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C.

Scans after birth revealed some brain defects not previously seen.

"In our study, we detected mild brain abnormalities on postnatal neuroimaging for babies whose imaging was normal during pregnancy. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to continue to monitor brain development for Zika-exposed infants after birth," Mulkey said in a Children's National news release.

The imaging "revealed that the majority of Zika-exposed fetuses had normal brain development. Tragically, in a small number of pregnancies, Zika-related brain abnormalities were quite severe," Mulkey said.

"Our data support the CDC's recommendation that cranial [ultrasound] be performed after Zika-exposed babies are born," Mulkey said. "In addition, there is clearly a need to follow these babies over time to gauge whether the brain anomalies we see in imaging affects language, motor and social skills."

The study was published online recently in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

As of October 2018, nearly 2,500 pregnant women in the United States had laboratory-confirmed Zika infection, and about 2,400 of them had given birth, according to the CDC. More than 100 U.S. infants have been born with Zika-associated birth defects, but most Zika-exposed U.S. infants were seemingly normal at birth.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on Zika and pregnancy.